States Oklahoma

Oklahoma currently screens for 53 conditions. Each state runs its program differently, for more detailed information please visit their website at
https://www.ok.gov/health/Community_&_Family_Health/Screening_&_Special_Services/Newborn_Screening_Program/.

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Here is a brochure for the state of Oklahoma. Brochure »

Content Last Updated: July 30, 2015

What Conditions are Screened For in Oklahoma?

About Newborn Screening in Oklahoma

Program Overview:

Every baby born in Oklahoma is required to have a blood test in the first week of life. The test requires a small amount of blood to be collected from your newborn’s heel. The blood test helps to find babies with certain “hidden” conditions. Babies with these conditions often appear healthy at birth and therefore it is difficult for doctors to know if a baby has one of the hidden conditions without a blood test. Failure to treat a baby who has one of these conditions within the first month of life can lead to intellectual disability, severe illness or death. Detecting it so early vastly improves your newborn’s chances at preventing the damaging effects of these conditions through immediate treatment.

The birthing facility or midwife collects the specimen and sends it to the Oklahoma State Department of Health for testing. The results are sent to the baby’s doctor who is indicated on the lab form. The blood test results will inform the doctor if more testing is needed. If your doctor tells you more testing is needed to confirm a diagnosis, do not delay. If a baby is found to have a condition, immediate care and treatment by a specialized medical doctor is needed in order to prevent permanent damage.

How is Newborn Screening Paid for in Oklahoma?

The test costs $152.62 and is paid for by most insurances. A baby will not be denied newborn screening based upon a family's inability to pay.

Policies and Resources

Opt-Out:

While it is strongly discouraged, a parent or guardian may refuse screening of their newborn if the test conflicts with their religious practices and beliefs. The refusal shall be documented in writing using the Newborn Screening Program Parent Refusal Form, which should be provided by your doctor. The signed form will be sent to the Newborn Screening Program Coordinator and will be placed in the newborn’s medical record.

Support for Families:

One of the concerns for families who find out their newborn has a condition is the possible increase in financial resources needed to care for their child. In an effort to help Oklahoma individuals and families, Oklahoma’s Board of Health will provide short-term and long-term follow-up services for children who have certain conditions confirmed by newborn testing. The Short-Term Follow-Up Program can answer questions about follow-up testing as well as immediate resources. The Short-Term Follow-Up Program can be reached at 405-271-6617 or 1-800-766-2223 extension 6617. To get more information about the long-term services available for you and your family, contact the Short-Term Follow-Up Program to be connected with a long-term follow-up nurse specialist.

Storage and Use of Dried Blood Spots:

After your newborn has been screened for the various conditions, some of their blood remains on the dried blood spot cards. Currently, these residual dried blood spots will be stored confidentially for only 42 days after the newborn screening and then they will be destroyed. After keeping the residual dried blood spots for the required 42 days, Oklahoma law says the Board of Health must have parental consent to store, transfer, use or database your newborn’s residual dried blood spots. Additionally, the storage and use of the residual dried blood spots for various public health purposes, including research, is only allowed if the state first obtains express parental consent.

Click here to see a copy of the blood spot card used in Oklahoma.